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Holy Prostitution

11 March, 2009

This is condensed from a dinner-time conversation (with credit to (((Girl)))):

I’m sure ya’ll have heard of Holy Prostitution, right?  This is, supposedly, an ancient practice — temple prostitutes in the Near East, for example.  It is no longer an accepted religious practice.

How about Christian prostitution?  Sounds rather unsavoury.  Or at the very least, un-Christian, right?

It’s easy:

God is the John.  He pays the hookers — love Me now, and you get paid with eternal life in heaven after death.  Of course, it is a delayed payment plan (with more loopholes than a sub-prime mortgage).  The preachers (ministers, priests, pastors, etc.) are the pimps — he connects the hookers with the John.

Makes sense to me.

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11 comments

  1. Not even a little bit surprising. Sad for the women involved.


  2. Yeah, just call me Mr. Obvious for this post.


  3. So where the hell’s the vice squad when you need them?


  4. Vice squad? You mean the Pope, the Cardinals, the Bishops and the Priests? I’m sure they are training the children.


  5. Billy
    A question for the gang.
    If the Misses makes me go to church and gives me sex am I a jesus prostitute? When she makes me go to church on special days and I can rim her does that make me a filthy jesus prostitute.
    I think jesus hung with the temple priests because well,you know,he was sort of hanging with the guys.
    The pimple on my ass will go away but these people will only fester. (CR)


  6. Dax: Welcome. Glad you could stop by.

    If the missus is forcing you to go to church, that would be (possibly) kidnapping or unlawful restraint. If she later gives you some loving, that would be the Stockholm Syndrome.


  7. Famous Urdu poet and writer and leading criminal lawyer, PL Chopra, popularly known as Naseem died about 39 years ago but his memories are still alive in his poetry even today.
    His son, Anashwar , a lawyer , not only inherited his profession and library but also carried forward his legacy of writing novels.
    In a tribute to his father, Anashwar published a book “Holy Prostitute”, a compilation of short stories written by Naseem, which was released here on March 1, coinciding with the first birth anniversary of his son, Yashwant .
    The book, released by Deepak Gupta, managing director, Plaza cable group of companies, and son-in-law of the chairman of Zee TV, Subash ji, and SP, Karnal, Aishwinder Singh Chawla, contains stories written by Naseem over a period spanning four decades.
    Born in Gujranwala (joint Punjab) on October 5, 1906, PL Chopra graduated from Dyal Singh College , Lahore , before joining government services as Junior Prosecutor in 1929. At the time of partition, he was serving in East Punjab, which happened to be on this side of the Radcliff Award and never returned to his birthplace in West Punjab (now in Pakistan ).
    After his retirement in 1961 as Prosecution Deputy Superintendent, Karnal, Naseem started practicing criminal law and soon became a leading criminal lawyer in Karnal district.
    However, his passion for penning down poems and stories in Urdu did not die down and he pursued criminal law and creative art of writing simultaneously with equal zeal till his demise on March 29, 1970.
    A man of varied interests, Naseem was a member of the Karnal Club and Bazm-E-Sukhan. His first poetry book in Urdu, Aaina-e-dil, was published by leading publishers of Delhi in 1961 and later translated in English under the title “The mirror of heart”.
    Naseem’s poetry contains the choicest oriental thoughts in pithy and several of his verses on amorous, heroic or philosophical themes have become an oft-quoted quotes to illustrate poignant suspenseful and lifting situations.
    The devotional element virtually eliminates the dividing link between mundane and the divine and creates a musical impact.
    The aroma of the oriental past merges into lifting melody and its verses grasp all delicate situations with an unsurpassable thoroughness of smile and metaphors, virtually entrapping nature at its best.
    Naseem has left behind three sons Nadan Mohan Chopra, Inder Mohan Chopra and Anashwar Chopra and three daughters but Anashwar followed his footprints and published four novels in Hindi- “Saanjhe Ki Poonji, Adhoora Anindya, Naari Ki Hatya and Naag Kanya.”


  8. Chopra: Thank you for the commercial.


  9. Mr Anashwar Chopra.pls inform availabitly of Holy Prositute book store name and address.
    Although the original devadasis were brahmacharinis their entire life, even the contemporary sexual aspects of the rituals that accompany dedication are now considered by many Hindus to be exploitative and not mandatory. Nevertheless this practice continues unabated in some places where a devadasi would usually acquire a “patron” after her “deflowering ceremony”. Patronship in a majority of cases is achieved at the time of the dedication ceremony itself. The patron who secures this right of spending the first night with the girl can pay a fixed sum of money to maintain a permanent liaison with the devadasi, pay to maintain a relationship for a fixed amount of time, or terminate the liaison after the deflowering ceremony. A permanent liaison with a patron does not bar the girl from entertaining other clients, unless he specifies otherwise. In case the girl entertains, other men have to leave the girl’s house when her patron comes.


  10. Dedication process
    Famous Urdu poet and writer and leading criminal lawyer, PL Chopra, popularly known as Naseem died about 39 years ago but his memories are still alive in his poetry even today.
    His son, Anashwar , a lawyer , not only inherited his profession and library but also carried forward his legacy of writing novels.
    In a tribute to his father, Anashwar published a book “Holy Prostitute”, a compilation of short stories written by Naseem, which was released here on March

    From the late medieval period until 1910, the Pottukattu or tali-tying dedication ceremony, was a widely advertised community event requiring the full cooperation of the local religious authorities. It initiates the a young girl into the devadasi profession and is performed in the temple by the priest. In the Brahminical tradition marriage is viewed as the only religious initiation (diksha) permissible to women. Thus the dedication is a symbolic “marriage” of the pubescent girl to the temple’s deity.

    In the sadanku or puberty ceremonies, the devadasi-initiate consummates her marriage with an emblem of the god borrowed from the temple as a stand-in ‘bridegroom’. From then onward, the devadasi is considered a nitya sumangali: a woman eternally free from the adversity of widowhood.

    She would then perform her ritual and artistic duties in the temple. The puberty ceremonies were an occasion not only for temple honor, but also for community feasting and celebration in which the local elites also participated. The music and dance and public display of the girl also helped to attract patrons.


  11. In a tribute to his father, Anashwar published a book “Holy Prostitute”, a compilation of short stories written by Sh.P.L.Chopra

    Send Response

    Your Message :

    *Your Name

    *Your E-mail

    Your Phone
    Holy Prostitute written by P.L.Chopra”Naseem.
    Book of Anshi Pocket Books,Karnal.
    achopra_1001@rediffmail.com

    Still alive in his poetry after 39 yrs
    Bhanu P. Lohumi
    Tribune News Service
    Karnal, March 12
    Famous Urdu poet and writer and leading criminal lawyer, PL Chopra, popularly known as Naseem died about 39 years ago but his memories are still alive in his poetry even today.
    His son, Anashwar , a lawyer , not only inherited his profession and library but also carried forward his legacy of writing novels.
    In a tribute to his father, Anashwar published a book “Holy Prostitute”, a compilation of short stories written by Naseem, which was released here on March 1, coinciding with the first birth anniversary of his son, Yashawn .
    The book, released by Deepak Gupta, managing director, Plaza cable group of companies, and son-in-law of the chairman of Zee TV, Subash ji, and SSP, Karnal, Aishwinder Singh Chawla, contains stories written by Naseem over a period spanning four decades.
    Born in Gujranwala (joint Punjab) on October 5, 1906, PL Chopra graduated from Dyal Singh College, Lahore, before joining government services as Junior Prosecutor in 1929. At the time of partition, he was serving in East Punjab, which happened to be on this side of the Radcliff Award and never returned to his birthplace in West Punjab (now in Pakistan).
    After his retirement in 1961 as Prosecution Deputy Superintendent, Karnal, Naseem started practicing criminal law and soon became a leading criminal lawyer in Karnal district.
    However, his passion for penning down poems and stories in Urdu did not die down and he pursued criminal law and creative art of writing simultaneously with equal zeal till his demise on March 29, 1970.
    A man of varied interests, Naseem was a member of the Karnal Club and Bazm-E-Sukhan. His first poetry book in Urdu, Aaina-e-dil, was published by leading publishers of Delhi in 1961 and later translated in English under the title “The mirror of heart”.
    Naseem’s poetry contains the choicest oriental thoughts in pithy and several of his verses on amorous, heroic or philosophical themes have become an oft-quoted quotes to illustrate poignant suspenseful and lifting situations.
    The devotional element virtually eliminates the dividing link between mundane and the divine and creates a musical impact.
    The aroma of the oriental past merges into lifting melody and its verses grasp all delicate situations with an unsurpassable thoroughness of smile and metaphors, virtually entrapping nature at its best.
    Naseem has left behind three sons Madan Mohan Chopra, Inder Mohan Chopra and Anashwar Chopra and three daughters but Anashwar followed his footprints and published four novels in Hindi- “Saanjhe Ki Poonji, Adhoora Anindya, Naari Ki Hatya and Naag Kanya.”
    Contact :-
    Anashwar Chopra



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